The Standard, 130 S. Main St., is closed after opening doors last fall. One partner, Kimball Webb has withdrawn his applications for a bar liquor license and a limited liability corporation and said he no longer is involved in the business. Co-owner Justin Patane said he plans to do some remodeling and relaunch the restaurant in the fall with changes in the menu and kitchen.

However, the property is posted for lease. There’s also a notice of a landlord lien posted by the Quechan Indian Tribe stating that it has “reentered and taken possession of the premises” because of the tenant’s failure to pay rents and other “charges and obligations” to the landlord. The lien notice is dated May 20. The notice further states that is the sums aren’t paid within 60, the landlord will sell the equipment, fixtures and personal property in the building that appears to be pretty much stripped of furnishings.

***

Ciao Bella has been sold and is now closed, confirmed Nan Bain, who with husband Anthony opened the restaurant in 2005. The restaurant, which specialized in Mediterranean cuisine, is located at 2255 S. 4th Ave.

New owners are Chef Robert Molina and his sister-in-law, Danielle Miranda. They plan to “revamp, remodel and reopen” in early July as Zeppelinz Kitchen and feature home-cooked favorites, according to Bain.

Molina had been a chef at Ciao Bella for four years before moving to the kitchen at DaBoyz and is now ready to branch out on his own “with my blessing,” Bain said. Molina will in charge of the kitchen of the new establishment while Miranda will be in the front of the house.

Bain explained that she is downsizing and looking forward to focusing on River City Grill, the other restaurant the couple owns. She added that the current Ciao Bella chef will be moving over to River City Grill to work his culinary magic there.

“It was nice to sell and not close,” Bain concluded. “We want to say thank you from the bottom of our hearts” to loyal patrons and guests Ciao Bella has served over the years.

***

Another restaurant, Wild Stix, also is closed. A sign on the door states: “Temporary closed. We’ll be moving out. You will hear from us soon.”

The phone number has been disconnected and the owners couldn’t be reached for more information on their future plans. The restaurant, described as “Asian fusion,” opened its doors in 2011 at 414 W. 16th St.

***

Nearby, ACE Cash Express is in the process of moving – or to be accurate, has all but moved – from its old address at 400 W. 16th St. It’s new home is at 1630 S. Pacific Ave., Suite 105. The phone number there is 329-4320.

An employee at the old address said the move will be completed by May 31 to the new location that has been open for business since March. It’s even listed in the new Dex phone directory.

The business offers cash advances, check cashing, direct deposit, prepaid services, bill payments and wire transfers and will be adding auto insurance.

The business is vacating the 16th Street building because the city is planning to demolish it in the near future as it prepares to start work on a project to improve the 4th Avenue-16th Street intersection.

***

Charki’s Teriyaki is now open at 2241 S. Avenue A, Suite 16. It serves salmon, chicken, beef and shrimp teriyaki bowls – “great food,” a reader reported. The restaurant is open from 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays and can be reached at (928) 247-9002.

***

Readers have been wondering what the activity is all about on the lot at the northwest corner of 40th Street and Foothills Boulevard where Cactus Propane had its winter sales.

The answer is the construction of a new sewer lift station for Far West Sewer and Water, said General Manager Andy Capstro, adding that he is looking forward to the project’s completion by the end of summer.

Capestro explained that the lift station will be capable of handling 75,000 to 100,000 gallons of sewage a day, transferring it from the Marwood Plant to the Section 14 Plant. This will help alleviate the load on Marwood Plant during the peak of the winter season.

He said Far West had purchased the property from Cactus Propane, which is in the process of clearing the lot of its tanks, water kiosk and building.

***

“When I mentioned to friends that we were going to spend four days in Yuma, the reaction ranged from ‘Why’ to ‘What are you going to do?’,” wrote Susan Montgomery in a lengthy article on examiner.com about her recent visit with friends to Yuma.

Some of the highlights she mentioned were various restaurants and lounges – Montgomery is identified as a food and wine examiner. The friends also hit a number of tourist stops and were here to take in the city’s recent Centennial celebration.

And so, she concluded: “There are plenty of fascinating places, restaurants and activities awaiting you in Yuma. It is an ideal getaway with family or friends. There is so much going on that your biggest challenge will be squeezing in all the exciting activities available. We went to Yuma not knowing what to expect and left knowing that we would be back again and again.”

***

Yuma also is on the tour circuit for six female travel writers, bloggers and filmmakers, including Kaysha Riggs of Yuma. They have set out in a recreational vehicle on the seven-day Whiskey Sister HerStory Tour (presented by Whiskey Sister Kentucky Bourbon) to seek out stories of colorful, rule-breaking women who put their stamps on the American Southwest. They’re also meeting with current female entrepreneurs, artists and chefs along the route.

They were in Yuma Saturday to explore the stories of women held at Yuma’s Territorial Prison and hear the tales of the women of downtown Yuma from Tina Clark, who also provided them with a special dinner at her cantina.

Follow their tour on http://pitch.pe/RQabHo.

Report Comings and Goings to jlobeck@yumasun.com or call Joyce Lobeck at 928-539-6853.

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